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Greg – Color & Light

December 17, 2009

Rebecca – Final Project

December 15, 2009

Rebecca – Material Alchemy

December 15, 2009

Rebecca – Color and Light

December 15, 2009

robert mapplethorpe

December 10, 2009

http://images.google.com/images?client=safari&rls=en&q=robert%20mapplethorpe&oe=UTF-8&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi

Pleasure in Looking (eve)

December 10, 2009

“I’ve gone from saint to whore and back to saint again, all in one lifetime.”– Ingrid Bergman

“I don’t want to dress up a picture with just my face” –Grace Kelly

“I think the quality of sexiness comes from within. It is something that is in you or it isn’t and it really doesn’t have much to do with breasts or thighs or the pout of your lips…You have to be born a sex symbol. You don’t become one. If you’re born with it, you’ll have it even when you’re 100 years old.” –Sophia Loren

“In a world ordered by sexual imbalance, pleasure in looking has been split between active/male and passive/female. The determining male gaze projects its phantasy on to the female form which is styled accordingly. In their traditional exhibitionist role women are simultaneously looked at and displayed, with their appearance coded for strong visual and erotic impact so that they can be said to connote to-be-looked-at-ness. Woman displayed as sexual object is the leit-motif of erotic spectacle: from pin-ups to striptease, from Ziegfeld to Busby Berkeley, she holds the look, plays to and signifies male desire. Mainstream film neatly combined spectacle and narrative…The presence of woman is an indispensable element of spectacle in normal narrative film,  yet her visual presence tends to work against the development of a story line, to freeze the flow of action in moments of erotic contemplation. This alien presence then has to be integrated into cohesion with the narrative…A male movie star’s glamorous characteristics are thus not those of the erotic object of the gaze, but those of the more perfect, more complete, more powerful ideal ego conceived in the original moment of recognition in front of the mirror. The character in the story can make things happen and control events better than the subject/spectator, just as the image in the mirror was more in control of motor coordination. In contrast to woman as icon, the active male figure (the ego ideal of the identification process) demands a three-dimensional space corresponding to that of the mirror-recognition in which the alienated subject internalised his own representation of this imaginary existence. He is a figure in a landscape…Women, whose image has continually been stolen and used for this end, cannot view the decline of the traditional film form with anything much more than sentimental regret.” –Laura Mulvey

“‘But I never looked like that!’ – How do you know? What is the ‘you’ you might or might not look like? Where do you find it – by which morphological or expressive calibration? Where is your authentic body? You are the only one who can never see yourself except as an image; you never see your eyes unless they are dulled by the gaze they rest upon the mirror or the lens (I am interested in seeing my eyes only when they look at you): even and especially for your own body, you are condemned to the repertoire of its images.” –Roland Barthes

Charis Loke – John Howe: A Few Lines on Making Lines

December 1, 2009

John Howe is one of my favourite artists – most well known for his illustration work, an example of which would be the famous Gandalf painting – and he writes beautiful blog posts. His most recent one concerns the etymology and history of that most ubiquitous of art tools, the pencil.